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Boston Scenes 8/24/17 Fight Supremacy

Residents of Boston, as well as nearby towns and states, joined Saturday’s Fight Supremacy march. Organizers estimate the march drew 15,000 people.
Many protestors’ signs referenced the fatal events in Charlottesville the week before. “If you’re not outraged, you’re not paying attention,” is the last Facebook post written by Heather Heyer, who was killed in Charlottesville while protesting the white supremacist rally.
Demonstrators readying to march to the Boston Common gathered outside Roxbury’s Madison Park High School where they overflowed the plaza and filled Malcolm X Boulevard.
Fight Supremacy marchers used chants and signs to decry any who would promote racism, white supremacy, white nationalism, neo-Nazism and similar mentalities.
The Fight Supremacy march was organized as a response to the events of Charlottesville and to a so-called Free Speech rally being held in Boston, whose original list of speakers drew criticism for including those with ties to white nationalism.
A protestor holds an “Antifacist Action” sign. Groups identifying as antifacist, or “antifa,” recently have drawn media attention for willingness to physically oppose white supremacists.
Bostonians turned out by the tens of thousands to demonstrate and chant against white supremacy and racism. An estimated 15,000 people joined Saturday’s Fight Supremacy march, and the crowd swelled to about 40,000 as marchers converged with like-minded demonstrators at the Boston Common.