Close
Current temperature in Boston - 62 °
BECOME A MEMBER
Get access to a personalized news feed, our newsletter and exclusive discounts on everything from shows to local restaurants, All for free.
Already a member? Sign in.
The Bay State Banner
BACK TO TOP
The Bay State Banner
POST AN AD SIGN IN

Trending Articles

Actions of Mississippi police Goon Squad ‘just tip of the iceberg’

‘Framing Freedom: The Harriet Hayden Albums’ offers glimpse of Black lives in Civil War-era Boston

Banner [Virtual] Art Gallery

READ PRINT EDITION

Health

Colon cancer: Diagnosed at 38
read more
Be Healthy
Colon cancer: Diagnosed at 38
Ebony Holmes, 40, attributed those pains in her stomach to something she ate. After all, she was 38 and in relatively good health. But the symptoms persisted and worsened.
>
Cruz_logo_teal-black

Banner Sports Sponsored by Cruz Companies

Colorectal cancer: An important topic of conversation
read more
Be Healthy
Colorectal cancer: An important topic of conversation
It’s pretty safe to assume that one’s colon is not a typical topic of conversation at the dinner table. Nor generally at any other time, for that matter. Perhaps it should be.
>
Medicare open enrollment: Follow the A, B, C’s
read more
Health
Medicare open enrollment: Follow the A, B, C’s
Medicare’s open enrollment period, which extends from October 15 to December 7, allows participants to choose plans for the following year.
>
November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month
read more
Health
November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month
Lung cancer is the third most common cancer in this country, but the most deadly. It is the leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women. According to the National Cancer Institute, an estimated 237,740 new cases will be diagnosed in 2022 and over 130,000 deaths.
>
The “hidden” melanoma
read more
Health
The “hidden” melanoma
The first Monday in May is Melanoma Day. In all probability, most people of color completely ignored it. That’s understandable. Melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, is more common in Whites. But Black people do not escape the disease altogether. Actually, a rare form of melanoma is more prevalent in Blacks.
>
Public Health Commission urges caution during holidays
read more
Health
Public Health Commission urges caution during holidays
>
February is cancer prevention month
read more
Health
February is cancer prevention month
Cancer is the second leading cause of death in this country exceeded only by heart disease. According to Cancer Facts & Figures 2021 published by the American Cancer Society, in 2021, there were an estimated 1.9 million new cancer cases and 608,570 deaths.
>
Physical activity and sickle cell disease
read more
Be Healthy
Physical activity and sickle cell disease
Billy Garrett, Jr. is just following in his grandfather’s footsteps. Bill Garrett was the first African American to play regularly on a Big Ten Conference varsity basketball team. Garrett, Jr., 26, shares his grandfather’s passion for basketball. He has played for the NBA G League as well as the New York Knicks. He’s now a shooting guard for the basketball league in Poland. Yet, Garrett has sickle cell disease.
>
COVID casts a light on health disparities
read more
Local News
COVID casts a light on health disparities
It took a personal health scare to get Thaddeus Miles into running. His longtime job as director of safety for MassHousing brought plenty of stress. One day in 2010, after attending a funeral, Miles headed to the gym. While bench pressing, he suddenly felt he was about to pass out. When the EMTs arrived, his blood pressure was 220/180; at the hospital he learned he had an enlarged heart.
>
Life Expectancy Gap Between Black And White Americans Closes By Nearly 50 Percent In 30 Years
read more
Health
Life Expectancy Gap Between Black And White Americans Closes By Nearly 50 Percent In 30 Years
>
Staying safe on the job during COVID-19 pandemic
read more
Sponsored
Staying safe on the job during COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic is far from over, but restrictions are relaxing in Massachusetts. That means that whether you’ve been working through the pandemic or are just heading back to work, there’s a good chance you’re going to come in contact with more people when you’re on the job.
>
COVID-19 rates still on the rise
read more
Covid19
COVID-19 rates still on the rise
Back in March of 2020 when the global coronavirus pandemic took hold, states and local governments in the United States instituted varying degrees of lock downs aimed at stopping the spread of the virus, which was initially thought to be spread primarily through contact with contaminated surfaces as well as through respiratory droplets.
>