Yawu Miller

Senior Editor


Yawu Miller began his career in journalism with the Banner, serving as a staff reporter in 1993. He became managing editor in 1996. After leaving the Banner in 2006, he continued with the paper as a freelance writer and photographer. He has also written freelance articles for Commonwealth Magazine, the Baltimore Afro American and the Boston Irish Reporter. Miller graduated from Dartmouth College in 1990 with a bachelor's degree in English.

Recent Stories

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Money Talk financial literacy conference focuses on wealth building

Entrepreneurs make connections at event

Last weekend, a collection of business leaders, financial professionals, activists and entrepreneurs set about the work of closing that gap during the Banner’s financial literacy conference on, “Money Talk: Building Black Wealth,” held at the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center.

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Boston’s building boom coming to Roxbury area

Locals seeking share of jobs and contracts

Although there are few luxury housing buildings planned between Dudley Square and Mattapan Square, $110 million in city- and state-funded projects in the pipeline for the Roxbury area promises to bring the construction boom to Boston’s black community.

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MBTA to begin construction on Mattapan station in spring

The MBTA will begin construction on the Mattapan station of the Fairmount Line in early spring of next year, working weekends and evenings to avoid disruptions in service on the commuter rail line, which runs through Hyde Park, Mattapan, Dorchester and Roxbury. At the end of the two-year construction project, riders from Mattapan Square will be able cut their travel time to downtown Boston in half, according to Desiree Patrice, a project manager with the MBTA.

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Tiny homes coming to Roxbury?

City seeking affordable options

The Urban Housing Unit landed in Roxbury last week, occupying a vacant lot on the corner of Blue Hill Avenue and Gaston Street, the rectangular white unit’s front door facing the street. Visitors could proceed through the glass entryway into the bedroom of the 380-square-foot dwelling, past a small bathroom and into the kitchen/dining/living room area — and be done with the tour in mere seconds.

Competing visions for future of academics at UMass Boston

Amid what many see as uncertain times, UMass Boston Provost Winston Langley removed the chairman of the Africana Studies Department, Robert Johnson, an action that sparked controversy. In an interview with the Banner last week, Langley said he removed Johnson after standard academic quality and development review, during which academics from outside the UMass system evaluated the quality of instruction in the Africana Studies department.

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Affordable housing activists, re-branded BRA at odds over vision for Boston

Complaints of displacement amid building boom

Both the name change and demonstration come as the city is in the midst of a construction boom that has generated luxury high-rises claiming space on the city’s skyline, heightened levels of real estate speculation and displaced working-class renters from gentrifying neighborhoods like South Boston and Jamaica Plain.

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Activists, city officials square off during JP planning meeting

While the city officials have been preoccupied with transportation corridors, activated streetscapes and incremental increases in the required 13 percent affordability for new housing construction, the activists have expressed alarm at the pace of displacement of low-income renters along the Washington Street corridor and fears that the BRA will do little to stem the rising tide of gentrification.

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Mass. SJC ruling takes aim at racial profiling

Justice cites ‘indignity’ of repeated stops

Supreme Judicial Court Justice Geraldine Hines authored a ruling in defense of blacks fleeing the police. The unanimous SJC ruling stated that people fleeing the police may be motivated by a desire to “avoid the recurring indignity of being racially profiled,” and that their flight should not be automatically interpreted as evidence of “criminal activity.”

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Chinatown residents seek say on city-owned parcels

Several dozen Chinatown activists met with city officials at the Quincy School last week to discuss strategies to stem the ongoing displacement residents are facing as pressure from for-profit developers continues to build. The activists want the Boston Redevelopment Authority to adhere to the Chinatown Master Plan, a document neighborhood residents created in 1990 and have amended as recently as 2010, to outline their goals for affordable housing and open space.

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Stopped, frisked and searched

Man says Walpole cops violated his rights

Jean-Paul Wahnon has never run afoul of the law. So when a Walpole police officer rifled through his Toyota Prius on an August afternoon and repeatedly asked whether the car was his and whether he had a gun in his possession, Wahnon was concerned.

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