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Susan Saccoccia

Contributing writer

Susan Saccocia is an independent writer whose essays, features, profiles and reviews explore theater, visual arts, jazz and dance in the U.S. and overseas. A regular contributor to the Bay State Banner, Susan has also been published in Art New England ,The Christian Science Monitor, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, Boston Magazine and other regional and nationwide media. An award-winning arts writer, Susan is also the recipient of three National Endowment for the Arts fellowships in arts journalism among other honors.



Recent Stories

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Ibsen’s classic ‘A Doll’s House’ on stage through Feb. 5

A scathing portrayal of the Helmers and their toxic compromises, the play premiered in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Dec. 21, 1879 and brought Ibsen international fame. Since its debut, the play has been published in 78 languages and remains on stage somewhere almost all the time. A new Huntington Theatre Company production of “A Doll’s House,” directed by Melia Bensussen with a script adapted by Bryony Lavery, is on stage through Feb. 5 at the Avenue of the Arts/BU Theatre, on Huntington Avenue. Although staged by a much-awarded director and performed by an accomplished cast, the production takes a while to mine the full power of Ibsen’s drama.

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Raucous comedy ‘Hand to God’ on stage through Feb. 4

Devilish sock puppet Tyrone taunts and tempts his five human companions into mayhem in the raucous, adult-only comedy. During this theater season, “Hand to God” is the most produced play in America.

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Italian renaissance books on display at Gardner Museum through January 16

Writing in quill pens crafted from bird’s wings, with inks ground from plants and minerals on parchments made from animal hides, scribes would then illuminate their pictures and lettering by breathing on stencils hand cuts from sheets of precious metal such as gold leaf. Ivory and gemstones also added glory, encrusting pages with shimmering, jewel-like embellishments.

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A towering retrospective: Kerry James Marshall at the Met

The career-long aspiration of Marshall is to summon the traditions and techniques of the Old Masters and render the black figure with prominence in the canon of Western painting. His works rewrite both art history and social history.

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Unfinished business: Kara Walker’s artwork deals with arenas of race, gender and identity

Renowned contemporary artist Kara Walker is known for elegant, provocative murals that employ hand-cut stencils to render the persistent legacy of slavery. She casts her silhouetted figures in violent or sexual scenes that evoke unfinished business in the arenas of race, gender and identity. Walker spoke at the Institute of Contemporary Art Boston last Thursday night, where one of her wall-sized installations is on display.

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Works of Doris Salcedo on view at Harvard Art Museums

In the wake of our own bruising election, it seems worth noting that the word “political” means power in a public sphere. In her works, Salcedo counters the annihilating force of political violence, which often mutes its victims, by making loss visible and evoking empathy across time and place.

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MFA exhibit invites visitors to linger, read and reflect

Saravejo-born artists and architectural historian Azra Aksamija explores Islam and its traditions coexisting in a multicultural society.

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The photos of Carrie Mae Weems are on display at the Ethelbert Cooper Gallery through Jan. 7

Often with humor, and almost always with beauty and style, Weems investigates and asserts power to those excluded from it on the home front, in the art world and in society at large.

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‘The Plough and the Stars’ on stage at American Repertory Theater

Written by Seán O’Casey (1880-1964), a socialist and the first prominent Irish playwright to write about Dublin’s working-class people, “The Plough and the Stars” alternates between scenes of humor and anguish in its neighborhood-scale portrayal of the Easter Rising of 1916.

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‘A philosopher with a trumpet’

Wynton Marsalis plays Pulitzer prize celebration at Harvard’s Sanders Theatre

Introducing the event on Saturday night was Wynton Marsalis, managing and artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center and director of Jazz Studies at the Juilliard School in New York. In 1997 his oratorio “Blood on the Fields,” about a slave’s journey to freedom, became the first jazz composition to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music.

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