Sandra Larson

Staff Writer

Sandra Larson has been writing for the Bay State Banner since 2009 and has contributed more than 100 stories on urban issues, including extensive coverage of foreclosure, affordable housing, minority jobs issues, and the city’s revitalization plans for Dudley Square in Roxbury. For the Banner and for Exhale Magazine, she has interviewed and profiled many prominent women, among them author Isabel Wilkerson, playwright Lydia Diamond, FACE Africa founder Saran Kaba Jones, former EPA administrator Lisa Jackson, and Massachusetts first lady Diane Patrick. Sandra holds a bachelor’s degree in biological aspects of conservation and a master’s degree in journalism. She is currently pursuing a master’s degree in urban and regional policy. She lives in Boston with her husband and 12-year-old son.

Recent Stories

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Foundations seeking solutions to high cost of new affordable housing

A Boston-based private funder collaborative has launched a competition for innovative strategies to increase the supply of permanent affordable housing for the lowest-income Massachusetts families. In the competition, announced at the Massachusetts State House Nov. 19, Home Funders plans to offer cash awards of $10,000 to $25,000 to organizations or teams that propose “well-crafted, innovative, feasible and sustainable” solutions to build or preserve housing for Extremely Low Income families.

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BPS hires social-emotional learning expert

Boston Public Schools has hired an Assistant Superintendent of Social Emotional Learning and Wellness, a new position intended to enhance offerings in non-academic skills such as collaboration, self-advocacy, anger management and conflict resolution.

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Photographer and jazz artist strives to give ‘moment of joy’

“Eyes With Wings,” the title of Arni Cheatham’s photography exhibit at the Piano Craft Gallery, is a metaphor for birds and their superior visual acuity — and it also reflects the artist’s approach. Out in nature with a camera, he lets his own eyes “take wing” and then works to share the joyous experience through photographs.

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City seeking transportation solutions

How will Bostonians get to work and move around the city in the future? Looking ahead to 2030, how might transportation improvements address challenges already evident today — a growing, diversifying and aging city population, increasing income inequality, congested streets and an overburdened public transit system? The City of Boston has been pondering these questions, with the help of an advisory group and public input from thousands of Hub residents and workers, for much of 2015. Last week, its “Go Boston 2030” initiative reached an interim milestone as Mayor Martin Walsh and the Boston Transportation Department released a report outlining a vision and goals.

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Bus Rapid Transit studied anew for Hub

Dudley to Mattapan, Harvard seen as feasible routes

The addition of “Gold Standard” Bus Rapid Transit lanes could cut travel time by nearly half between Dudley and Haymarket or Harvard, and by more than one-third between Dudley and Mattapan, according to a report on BRT by the Barr Foundation, a Boston-based private foundation that focuses on education, climate, and arts and culture.

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Legislators advance profiling bills

Bills would require police to report data on pedestrian stops

The proposed legislation, introduced by Rep. Byron Rushing and senators Sonia Chang-Diaz and Linda Dorcena Forry, aims to prohibit racial profiling during motor vehicle and pedestrian stops, and to require increased data collection and review to identify racial disparities in policing practices. The law would apply to all state, municipal, college and university law enforcement officers.

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Legislators, activists advocate for increase in early education

Massachusetts may be a national leader in K–12 education, but it is falling behind in pre-kindergarten education, according to many of the education and children’s advocates, parents, officials, and legislators who testified at a State House hearing last week.

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Getting a jump on financial literacy

Bank Day educates teen workers to take charge of their money

Hundreds of Boston area young people streamed into the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center on July 27 for the city’s first-ever Youth Bank Day, an event that brought teens face-to-face with representatives from financial institutions and organizations that help navigate the hurdles of getting into and financing college.

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Design standards set for new Garrison Trotter housing

The city of Boston’s Department of Neighborhood Development and community members from Roxbury’s Garrison Trotter Neighborhood Association have forged a set of design principles to guide residential development on some city-owned vacant land parcels. As part of a new Neighborhood Homes Initiative, the DND plans to offer reduced land pricing and subsidy funding to spur the creation of home ownership opportunities affordable to a range of income levels.

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Shopping while black?

J.P. liquor store staff finger UMass prof. as perp in cognac heist

Robert Johnson, chairman of Africana Studies at UMass Boston, was falsely identified as the thief who made off with 20 bottles of cognac from a Jamaica Plain liquor store earlier this year and taken to the Area E police station for questioning. Johnson says he bears little resemblance to the suspect depicted in grainy stills from a surveillance video and says he is considered filing a complaint with the Mass. Commission Against Discrimination.

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