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Sandra Larson

Staff Writer

Sandra Larson has been writing for the Bay State Banner since 2009 and has contributed more than 100 stories on urban issues, including extensive coverage of foreclosure, affordable housing, minority jobs issues, and the city’s revitalization plans for Dudley Square in Roxbury. For the Banner and for Exhale Magazine, she has interviewed and profiled many prominent women, among them author Isabel Wilkerson, playwright Lydia Diamond, FACE Africa founder Saran Kaba Jones, former EPA administrator Lisa Jackson, and Massachusetts first lady Diane Patrick. Sandra holds a bachelor’s degree in biological aspects of conservation and a master’s degree in journalism. She is currently pursuing a master’s degree in urban and regional policy. She lives in Boston with her husband and 12-year-old son.



Recent Stories

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For senior homeowners, repair costs loom large

Aging housing stock and fixed incomes leave Boston seniors vulnerable

Traditional wisdom says home ownership provides economic security in old age, but as the senior population swells, repair costs rise and more people enter retirement saddled by debt, many elders find themselves “house-rich but cash-poor,” unable to keep up with repairs or adapt the home to be safe for frailer bodies.

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Expert describes toll of family homelessness

Mental health, brain development suffer

Homelessness-related stress and trauma plays a role in poor maternal health and poor parenting, which then affects child development, said Carmela DeCandia, who is co-author of a recent report on family homelessness. Ninety-three percent of homeless mothers have a history of trauma. Thirty-six percent are suffering some sort of post-traumatic stress disorder — triple the incidence of PTSD in the general population of women. These conditions are often factors in substance abuse and depression.

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Local AARP honors ‘nanas’ raising grandkids

A group of lucky Grove Hall children were served an elegant afternoon tea on Saturday. Wearing their best dresses or jackets and ties, they sat at beautifully-set tables at Boston Public Library’s Grove Hall branch and enjoyed such delicacies as mini scones with lemon curd, blueberry muffins, fruit kabobs, and mini sandwiches of grilled cheese or jam-and-Fluff. They sipped tea or cocoa from delicate floral-patterned china tea cups

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City floats latest Cass Blvd. plan at community meeting

New bus lanes, street widening dropped; community still skeptical of plans

The Boston Transportation Department last week unveiled its latest revision of Melnea Cass Boulevard redesign plans, reviving a process stalled by community resistance at several stages over the past three-and-a-half years. The new plan no longer includes the bus rapid transit lanes that were a key part of earlier versions.

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Mayors talk inequality, financial empowerment at UMass Boston forum

Mayor Martin J. Walsh and the mayors of three other large U.S. cities shared a stage at UMass Boston Sunday to discuss financial empowerment strategies that help cities address increasing income inequality and persistent poverty.

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City pursues improvements for elderly residents

Mayor Martin Walsh and the city’s Elderly Commission have launched an Age-Friendly Boston initiative with the aim of making Boston a place that supports senior citizens in continuing to lead productive, safe and healthy lives.

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Mixed reactions to Egleston Square proposal

Some wary of height, parking for 76-unit project

Community members crowded into a meeting room at Brookside Community Health Center last week to hear details and offer comments on a market-rate residential/retail development proposed for 3200 Washington Street in Egleston Square.

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BPL opens new teen, children’s spaces

Boston Public Library on Feb. 21 unveiled the renovated second floor of its Central Branch’s Johnson Building, featuring dazzling new spaces for children, tweens, teens and adults.

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Transit activists hopeful MBTA shut downs will spur investment in system

In the aftermath of the historic January and February snowstorms in Boston that caused transit shutdowns, stuck trains, borrowed shuttle buses and frustrating delays at frigid platforms, the MBTA announced it could be another 30 days before full service resumes on its rail lines.

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Snow piles, cancellations - and good deeds

After multiple storms piled more than 90 inches of snow on Boston from mid-January to mid-February — and with more snow expected this week — the city is a mess, with clogged streets and sidewalks, drift-buried cars, countless cancellations, tempers wearing thin and few places to put snow even where shovels and plows attempted to keep up.

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