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Melvin B. Miller

Publisher & Editor

617-936-7796

A native of Boston, Melvin B. Miller has been actively involved in political and public affairs for more than 40 years. In 1965, he founded the Bay State Banner, a weekly newspaper advocating the interests of Greater Boston’s African American community. Miller has served as the Banner’s publisher and editor since its inception.

Prior to the establishment of the Banner, Miller was an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. In 1973, the State Banking Commissioner appointed him as the Conservator of the Unity Bank and Trust Company, Boston’s first minority bank. Under his stewardship the bank’s operations became profitable for the first time. In 1977, the Mayor of Boston appointed him as one of the three original commissioners of the Boston Water and Sewer Commission. He later became chairman of the commission in 1980, and managed its operating budget of $193.2 million.

Miller was also a founding partner in the law firm of Fitch, Miller and Tourse, a primarily corporate law firm and he engaged in the practice of law there from 1981 until 1991. He was also Vice President and General Counsel of WHDH-TV, Boston’s CBS affiliate from 1982 until 1993.

A long-term trustee of Boston University, Miller became a Trustee Emeritus in 2005. He served in the three-member National Advisory Council to American Companies doing business in South Africa under the Sullivan Principles until the council was disbanded after the fall of apartheid. Miller is also a trustee of the Huntington Theatre Company and a director of OneUnited Bank, the largest African American owned and operated bank in the U.S.

A graduate of Boston Latin School, Harvard University and Columbia Law School, an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred on him by Suffolk University and Emerson College.



Recent Stories

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An American con job

Donald Trump’s demeanor and mendacity caused blacks to view him as a huckster. Only 9 percent of blacks who voted in the 2016 election voted for Trump. What will it take for the majority of the electorate to come to that awareness

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Blacks must fight to defend democratic rights

Arroyo and other department heads of Walsh’s administration are employees at will. The mayor has the right to fire them, even without cause. After an internal investigation which did not include cross examination of the complainant, Walsh decided to fire Arroyo. The hearing before the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination has not yet been held.

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Voters of color must flex political muscle

Much at stake in Nov. 7 election

Fortunately there are two competent candidates for mayor. Black voters have to begin to think strategically. It would be disastrous with the Trump attitudes so influencing public policy to have a powerless black and Latino electorate. Those not registered to vote should do so and go to the polls on Tuesday, Nov. 7.

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White supremacy: the oligarchic con-job

Thinking Americans should soon become tired of having their pockets picked by greedy oligarchs who keep them inflamed with racial antagonism. The people should remember how haughty peers in Europe oppressed their grandparents or others and they will see a similarity.

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An efficient government is essential

Former President Ronald Reagan endeared himself to conservatives with his belittling assessment of the role of government. He once stated, “The nine most terrifying words in the English language are ‘I'm from the government, and I'm here to help.’” After hurricanes Harvey and Irma, residents of Houston and Florida do not likely support that point of view. Very often the government is the only reliable refuge when natural or personal crises afflict U.S. citizens.

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Higher education now more necessary than ever

The cost of education is now so expensive that some have concluded that it makes economic sense to get a job right after high school. The problem with that conclusion is that by 2020, it is projected that 65 percent of available jobs will require postsecondary education.

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The poor are entitled to justice

With his peremptory pardon of Joe Arpaio, the former sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona, Donald Trump has demonstrated that the principle “no man is above the law” is a fraud.

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Slavery can’t be edited out of U.S. history

After the organized racist and anti-Semitic violence in Charlottesville, many Americans became aware for the first time of the dynamic influence of the Confederacy that initiated America’s Civil War. Reliable journalistic reports established that there are an estimated 1500 statues, monuments and plaques as tributes to those who were prominent figures in the Confederate states and the Civil War against the U.S. government.

A complex, universal problem

At the time of the Declaration of Independence in 1776, 41 of the 56 delegates owned slaves. As a consequence, it would be an obliteration of the nation’s history if there was a decision to remove any record of or memorial to a slave-holding Founding Father.

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White nationalism: an economic dead-end

The spirit of America rests in the credo of the Declaration of Independence. The white nationalists reject that standard. Americans who abide by the vision of national unity must be prepared to oppose those who bring nothing more than their racial and religious hate and hostility.

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