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Melvin B. Miller

Publisher & Editor

617-936-7796

A native of Boston, Melvin B. Miller has been actively involved in political and public affairs for more than 40 years. In 1965, he founded the Bay State Banner, a weekly newspaper advocating the interests of Greater Boston’s African American community. Miller has served as the Banner’s publisher and editor since its inception.

Prior to the establishment of the Banner, Miller was an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. In 1973, the State Banking Commissioner appointed him as the Conservator of the Unity Bank and Trust Company, Boston’s first minority bank. Under his stewardship the bank’s operations became profitable for the first time. In 1977, the Mayor of Boston appointed him as one of the three original commissioners of the Boston Water and Sewer Commission. He later became chairman of the commission in 1980, and managed its operating budget of $193.2 million.

Miller was also a founding partner in the law firm of Fitch, Miller and Tourse, a primarily corporate law firm and he engaged in the practice of law there from 1981 until 1991. He was also Vice President and General Counsel of WHDH-TV, Boston’s CBS affiliate from 1982 until 1993.

A long-term trustee of Boston University, Miller became a Trustee Emeritus in 2005. He served in the three-member National Advisory Council to American Companies doing business in South Africa under the Sullivan Principles until the council was disbanded after the fall of apartheid. Miller is also a trustee of the Huntington Theatre Company and a director of OneUnited Bank, the largest African American owned and operated bank in the U.S.

A graduate of Boston Latin School, Harvard University and Columbia Law School, an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred on him by Suffolk University and Emerson College.



Recent Stories

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Loans of the last resort

Payday loans have been disastrous for many low income households. The default rate is about 20 percent and many borrowers are forced to renew with additional fees. Borrowers could end up with a debt that includes more fees and interest than the original amount of the loan. Now the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau proposes restrictions to require that lenders establish the borrower’s capacity to repay the loan.

Protesters sabotage Brooklyn district attorney

Thompson offended liberals when he failed to press for imprisonment of a former police officer who, during his days as a rookie, shot and killed Akai Gurley by accident.

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An abuse of citizens’ rights

A new Louisiana law categorizes crimes against police as hate crimes, triggering harsher sentences.

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Juneteenth has no beneficial meaning in Mass.

Blacks observing the Texas holiday of Junteenth would do well to understand the historical inaccuracies of the commemoration, and learn about the Bay State’s earlier history of abolition.

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Ali's assertiveness set a standard

Muhammad Ali’s prodigious boxing talent would normally be enough to enthrall his fans, but Ali had the character and the intelligence also to move forcefully outside the ring beyond the confines of America’s racial restrictions.

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Nothing less than betrayal

Many blacks believe that Clarence Thomas is more like the quisling in the slave quarters whose function was to preserve the authority of white privilege.

The death of journalistic responsibility

Decades ago, Americans often referred to the press as the Fourth Estate. That was an honorific to acknowledge the critical role of the press in monitoring the nation’s democratic system of government, but that term is not heard so frequently these days as the press has joined with other media to become primarily a significant source of entertainment.

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To your health!

According to government data, in 1900, whites lived on average for 15 years longer than blacks. Since then the gap has been closing. In 1990 whites still lived seven years longer, but federal records indicate that the gap narrowed to 3.4 years in 2014. Blacks live an average expectancy of 75.6 years compared to 79 years for whites.

Trump gets it wrong again

Calling Sen. Warren Pocahontas reconfirmed his lack of understanding of American history.

Trump has reconfirmed his fundamental racial insensitivity and his lack of understanding of American history.

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Diversity run amok

African Americans still toiling for full equality throughout the nation should not be hampered by the negative implications of diversity that have been sown by Harvard’s ill-advised policy.

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