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Melvin B. Miller

Publisher & Editor

617-936-7796

A native of Boston, Melvin B. Miller has been actively involved in political and public affairs for more than 40 years. In 1965, he founded the Bay State Banner, a weekly newspaper advocating the interests of Greater Boston’s African American community. Miller has served as the Banner’s publisher and editor since its inception.

Prior to the establishment of the Banner, Miller was an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. In 1973, the State Banking Commissioner appointed him as the Conservator of the Unity Bank and Trust Company, Boston’s first minority bank. Under his stewardship the bank’s operations became profitable for the first time. In 1977, the Mayor of Boston appointed him as one of the three original commissioners of the Boston Water and Sewer Commission. He later became chairman of the commission in 1980, and managed its operating budget of $193.2 million.

Miller was also a founding partner in the law firm of Fitch, Miller and Tourse, a primarily corporate law firm and he engaged in the practice of law there from 1981 until 1991. He was also Vice President and General Counsel of WHDH-TV, Boston’s CBS affiliate from 1982 until 1993.

A long-term trustee of Boston University, Miller became a Trustee Emeritus in 2005. He served in the three-member National Advisory Council to American Companies doing business in South Africa under the Sullivan Principles until the council was disbanded after the fall of apartheid. Miller is also a trustee of the Huntington Theatre Company and a director of OneUnited Bank, the largest African American owned and operated bank in the U.S.

A graduate of Boston Latin School, Harvard University and Columbia Law School, an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred on him by Suffolk University and Emerson College.



Recent Stories

A race-baiting strategy

Trump is masterful at playing the race card. The skill requires that his comments or deeds be defensible as innocent of racism. For him to be branded an outright bigot would not help his worldly image. But Trump is certainly aware that about half of his supporters have negative attitudes towards blacks. Several polls have established this fact. With his former assumption of the leadership of the “birther” movement to challenge Barack Obama’s constitutional legitimacy to be president, Trump demonstrated a willingness to be the regent of the racists.

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Hillary – the clear choice for Sanders supporters

Avid supporters of Bernie Sanders who do not vote for Hillary Clinton will have failed to understand Sanders’ political revolution. The objective is to gain support for issues that enhance the economic status of the average citizen. The charisma of the resident of the White House is helpful but is essentially irrelevant. Strategically, the Sanders revolution can maintain its power only with its solid vote for the presidential candidate who is most likely to be sympathetic to its goals. That candidate is Hillary Clinton.

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Applying a double standard to patriotism

Some critics of Colin Kaepernick condemn his protest as seditious, but how could that be when Donald Trump, the Republican candidate for U.S. president, has made public comments during the campaign that are at the very least subversive. Criticism of Trump has been relatively mild when compared with the outcry against Kaepernick who did no more than kneel during the national anthem, in constitutionally protected protest.

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Police abuse – 21st century lynching?

The Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice was established in 1957 to bring the force of the federal government against the violation of voting rights in the South. This same federal clout will be needed to end the neo-lynching of unarmed blacks by the police.

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Vote Thursday Sept 8 in 6th Suffolk primary

Whoever wins the Sept. 8 election will likely become the community’s representative on Beacon Hill.

Trump lies with concern for black issues

Despite never demonstrating any special interest in the country’s racial problem, Donald Trump now has the audacity to assert that his election as president will benefit African Americans. “What the hell do you have to lose?” he callously asks.

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Commentary: Vote Thursday, Sept. 8 for 7th Suffolk District

Gloria Fox has held that office in the 7th Suffolk District since 1985, and has decided to retire. Whoever wins the Sept. 8 election will likely become the community’s representative on Beacon Hill.

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A troubling Trump victory in the primary

That Trump could do so well in Massachusetts, a primarily blue state, should induce Hillary Clinton supporters not to take victory for granted despite the encouraging current polling results.

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Constitutional violations by police should be a federal crime

It is time for citizens to have the right to file in federal court a criminal complaint against police officers who violate their constitutional rights.

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The American Con Game

The race problem persists in America. Reaction to Donald Trump’s hostile remarks indicates that it is alive and well. Remedies for the problem have had only limited results. There is no consensus on what has provoked the conflict. Some now believe that whites with modest incomes have been intentionally deceived by the plutocrats in order to establish a conflict among working-class Americans to prevent them from organizing for social change.

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