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Melvin B. Miller

Publisher & Editor

617-936-7796

A native of Boston, Melvin B. Miller has been actively involved in political and public affairs for more than 40 years. In 1965, he founded the Bay State Banner, a weekly newspaper advocating the interests of Greater Boston’s African American community. Miller has served as the Banner’s publisher and editor since its inception.

Prior to the establishment of the Banner, Miller was an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. In 1973, the State Banking Commissioner appointed him as the Conservator of the Unity Bank and Trust Company, Boston’s first minority bank. Under his stewardship the bank’s operations became profitable for the first time. In 1977, the Mayor of Boston appointed him as one of the three original commissioners of the Boston Water and Sewer Commission. He later became chairman of the commission in 1980, and managed its operating budget of $193.2 million.

Miller was also a founding partner in the law firm of Fitch, Miller and Tourse, a primarily corporate law firm and he engaged in the practice of law there from 1981 until 1991. He was also Vice President and General Counsel of WHDH-TV, Boston’s CBS affiliate from 1982 until 1993.

A long-term trustee of Boston University, Miller became a Trustee Emeritus in 2005. He served in the three-member National Advisory Council to American Companies doing business in South Africa under the Sullivan Principles until the council was disbanded after the fall of apartheid. Miller is also a trustee of the Huntington Theatre Company and a director of OneUnited Bank, the largest African American owned and operated bank in the U.S.

A graduate of Boston Latin School, Harvard University and Columbia Law School, an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred on him by Suffolk University and Emerson College.



Recent Stories

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Police violence is about more than broken windows

Americans must be willing to adopt imaginative programs to end the police victimization of black men.

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An attack on black progress

Gov. Charlie Baker has selected Ronald L. Walker II to join his administration as secretary of Labor and Workforce Development. An objective review of Ron Walker’s resume would determine that he is uniquely qualified for that post. As co-founder and president of Next Street Financial, Walker has developed a company to provide financial and consulting services to small businesses and nonprofit organizations. However, The Boston Globe has challenged that selection.

More than ever, education is the key to success

Academic achievement was always respected by African Americans. Even in the days of slavery, education was desired, although it was often unattainable. Black commitment to the importance of educational achievement should now be stronger than ever.

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New York police defiantly turn away from civility

New York police officers violated basic laws of civility when they protested during New York Mayor Bill de Blasio’s formal condolences to the family at the funeral of their fellow officer, Rafael Ramos, who was murdered by a deranged killer.

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Edward Brooke blazed trail for black progress

Sen. Edward W. Brooke will always remain a hero to the veterans of the battle for civil rights. He was keenly intelligent, extraordinarily gracious and endowed with natural and persuasive oratorical skills. Brooke set a standard for competence which very few can attain. Keywords: Edward Brooke obituary, Edward Brooke and the Civil Rights Movement, Roxbury, Gov. Christian Herter and U.S. Sen. Leverett Saltonstall, black Republicans

Rage: the product of a violent culture

As the assassination of the New York police officers indicates, non-violence is not an infallible effort.

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The death of courtesy

At the end of December it’s time to develop New Year’s resolutions to correct the foibles of the prior year. In order to do this, there has to be an objective assessment of one’s flaws. However, the capacity to perceive personal shortcomings may be greatly diminished in this age of egocentricity.

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Building wealth, even in the season of giving

At a time when many are focused on spending, it’s more important than ever to focus on building wealth.

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Rush to condemn Cosby premature

The uncorroborated complaints of sexual impropriety by Bill Cosby arouse the distressing memory among elders of similar past claims against black men.

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Racism: A scientific delusion

Many Americans consider as racist acts both the shooting death of the unarmed Michael Brown and the failure of the grand jury to indict his killer, Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson. Such incidents of police abuse occur all too frequently. Racism has been a human affliction for centuries.

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