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Melvin B. Miller

Publisher & Editor

617-936-7796

A native of Boston, Melvin B. Miller has been actively involved in political and public affairs for more than 40 years. In 1965, he founded the Bay State Banner, a weekly newspaper advocating the interests of Greater Boston’s African American community. Miller has served as the Banner’s publisher and editor since its inception.

Prior to the establishment of the Banner, Miller was an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. In 1973, the State Banking Commissioner appointed him as the Conservator of the Unity Bank and Trust Company, Boston’s first minority bank. Under his stewardship the bank’s operations became profitable for the first time. In 1977, the Mayor of Boston appointed him as one of the three original commissioners of the Boston Water and Sewer Commission. He later became chairman of the commission in 1980, and managed its operating budget of $193.2 million.

Miller was also a founding partner in the law firm of Fitch, Miller and Tourse, a primarily corporate law firm and he engaged in the practice of law there from 1981 until 1991. He was also Vice President and General Counsel of WHDH-TV, Boston’s CBS affiliate from 1982 until 1993.

A long-term trustee of Boston University, Miller became a Trustee Emeritus in 2005. He served in the three-member National Advisory Council to American Companies doing business in South Africa under the Sullivan Principles until the council was disbanded after the fall of apartheid. Miller is also a trustee of the Huntington Theatre Company and a director of OneUnited Bank, the largest African American owned and operated bank in the U.S.

A graduate of Boston Latin School, Harvard University and Columbia Law School, an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred on him by Suffolk University and Emerson College.



Recent Stories

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A legacy of terror

The Equal Justice Initiative has recently issued an academically rigorous report on the historical and sociological implications of the odious practice of terror lynching that sustained the national policy of white supremacy.

The consequences of prolonged neglect of MBTA

When things go wrong, the immediate reaction is to blame someone for the problem. Finding the culprit seems to be more important than curing the crisis. With the collapse of Boston’s public transit system because of the mounting snowfall, the media quickly asserted that the inconvenience was caused by the alleged incompetence of the MBTA General Manager Beverly Scott.

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Delayed diversity in the NHL

The New England Patriots’ Super Bowl victory provides an indication of the value of racial diversity. Without consideration of race, the team management selects players on the basis of talent and availability. Then through practice and team discipline, the players become a united gridiron force on game day. Other professional sports teams — football, basketball and baseball — have a similar approach, but black players have not been prominent in hockey.

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A new challenge to fair housing

It would be truly oppressive for the Supreme Court to rule that the government cannot establish incentives to achieve the goal of racial integration in housing. The nation recognized in 1968 that segregated housing is contrary to the principal of equal rights. The Fair Housing Act would be an unacceptable remedy if it failed to curtail the further implementation of segregated housing, even if it was inadvertent.

The affluent have always had a disproportionate impact on politics

Billionaire Koch brothers plan super fund of almost $900 million to finance candidates

The top 1 percent may control the money, but each citizen has only one vote. The 99 percent still outnumber them.

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Preserving black artists in Roxbury

It is more important than ever to support Museum of National Center of Afro-American Artists

For many years Boston has enjoyed a flourishing community of African American artists. However, the recent death of John Wilson, there is a realization that we are losing too many of the prominent elders of the art world.

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The perennial practice of police abuse

The Magna Carta, executed at Runnymede, England in 1215, was the precedent for the Bill of Rights and the right of judicial review that are so critical to Anglo-American jurisprudence. Yet protests against police violence in America continue 800 years later.

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Police violence is about more than broken windows

Americans must be willing to adopt imaginative programs to end the police victimization of black men.

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An attack on black progress

Gov. Charlie Baker has selected Ronald L. Walker II to join his administration as secretary of Labor and Workforce Development. An objective review of Ron Walker’s resume would determine that he is uniquely qualified for that post. As co-founder and president of Next Street Financial, Walker has developed a company to provide financial and consulting services to small businesses and nonprofit organizations. However, The Boston Globe has challenged that selection.

More than ever, education is the key to success

Academic achievement was always respected by African Americans. Even in the days of slavery, education was desired, although it was often unattainable. Black commitment to the importance of educational achievement should now be stronger than ever.

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