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Melvin B. Miller

Publisher & Editor

617-936-7796

A native of Boston, Melvin B. Miller has been actively involved in political and public affairs for more than 40 years. In 1965, he founded the Bay State Banner, a weekly newspaper advocating the interests of Greater Boston’s African American community. Miller has served as the Banner’s publisher and editor since its inception.

Prior to the establishment of the Banner, Miller was an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. In 1973, the State Banking Commissioner appointed him as the Conservator of the Unity Bank and Trust Company, Boston’s first minority bank. Under his stewardship the bank’s operations became profitable for the first time. In 1977, the Mayor of Boston appointed him as one of the three original commissioners of the Boston Water and Sewer Commission. He later became chairman of the commission in 1980, and managed its operating budget of $193.2 million.

Miller was also a founding partner in the law firm of Fitch, Miller and Tourse, a primarily corporate law firm and he engaged in the practice of law there from 1981 until 1991. He was also Vice President and General Counsel of WHDH-TV, Boston’s CBS affiliate from 1982 until 1993.

A long-term trustee of Boston University, Miller became a Trustee Emeritus in 2005. He served in the three-member National Advisory Council to American Companies doing business in South Africa under the Sullivan Principles until the council was disbanded after the fall of apartheid. Miller is also a trustee of the Huntington Theatre Company and a director of OneUnited Bank, the largest African American owned and operated bank in the U.S.

A graduate of Boston Latin School, Harvard University and Columbia Law School, an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred on him by Suffolk University and Emerson College.



Recent Stories

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Voting: A key step to full equality

Efforts to gain social and economic equality of whites will come to little if blacks don’t exercise their right to vote.

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Another undeserved attack on an African American institution

A Boston Globe article highlighting the black-owned OneUnited Bank’s low Community Reinvestment Act score ignores the work the bank does investing the majority of its lending dollars in underserved urban areas.

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Visionaries seeking affluence for the people

Charles Stith and Andrew Young worked with federal regulators to shore up community reinvestment regulations for banks, helping ensure the economic benefits of banking activity are more broadly shared in the United States.

Beyond race and gender

This year’s statewide election features a gender-diverse pool of candidates for constitutional offices.

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Stay at the top of the political game

With higher-than average turnout numbers in recent elections, blacks have become a major force in Boston politics. High turnout in black communities could determine the outcome of the 2014 statewide election.

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Ballot questions let voters legislate

The Banner weighs in on the four questions on the 2014 Massachusetts ballot.

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No stop-and-frisk without probable cause to arrest

Barring police from stopping and searching people unless they have probable cause to arrest would go a long way toward bettering relations between the department and the community.

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Be somebody: Register to vote

Everybody has equal say on Election Day.

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America’s race sickness afflicts public health

Many Americans hold negative views of Obama Care, unless they don’t know they’re receiving it.

Commentary: Shifting sexual mores present new challenges

In January, a White House report entitled “Rape and Sexual Assault: A Renewed Call to Action” found that one in five women have been sexually assaulted in college. President Obama launched a new effort in September called “It’s On Us” to combat such offenses on college campuses. Old grads wonder whether the current openness of college dormitories is partially to blame.

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