Quantcast

Melvin B. Miller

Publisher & Editor

617-936-7796

A native of Boston, Melvin B. Miller has been actively involved in political and public affairs for more than 40 years. In 1965, he founded the Bay State Banner, a weekly newspaper advocating the interests of Greater Boston’s African American community. Miller has served as the Banner’s publisher and editor since its inception.

Prior to the establishment of the Banner, Miller was an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. In 1973, the State Banking Commissioner appointed him as the Conservator of the Unity Bank and Trust Company, Boston’s first minority bank. Under his stewardship the bank’s operations became profitable for the first time. In 1977, the Mayor of Boston appointed him as one of the three original commissioners of the Boston Water and Sewer Commission. He later became chairman of the commission in 1980, and managed its operating budget of $193.2 million.

Miller was also a founding partner in the law firm of Fitch, Miller and Tourse, a primarily corporate law firm and he engaged in the practice of law there from 1981 until 1991. He was also Vice President and General Counsel of WHDH-TV, Boston’s CBS affiliate from 1982 until 1993.

A long-term trustee of Boston University, Miller became a Trustee Emeritus in 2005. He served in the three-member National Advisory Council to American Companies doing business in South Africa under the Sullivan Principles until the council was disbanded after the fall of apartheid. Miller is also a trustee of the Huntington Theatre Company and a director of OneUnited Bank, the largest African American owned and operated bank in the U.S.

A graduate of Boston Latin School, Harvard University and Columbia Law School, an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred on him by Suffolk University and Emerson College.



Recent Stories

Forrest County: An early battle for voting rights

Little attention has been given to the role of the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice in exposing the egregious discrimination in the voting rights of blacks.

Tease photo

Uncovering white privilege

A recent Australian experiment documented preferential treatment whites receive, a rare glimpse at the seldom studied but pervasive privileges afforded whites.

Tease photo

Race: A diversion from America’s real problems

Americans should begin to talk diplomatically with one another to discover a way to end this debilitating racial conflict for the good of the country.

Tease photo

A hostile environment for black business success

Efforts by blacks to achieve economic success in the United States have historically been met with violence, underscoring a longstanding animosity toward black business

Tease photo

The beginning of a black business boom?

The racial wealth gap in America will never diminish significantly without a major increase in the growth of black ownership in businesses.

Tease photo

Systemic injustice

The recently published U.S. Department of Justice report on the Ferguson, Mo. police department was shocking even to tough law and order conservatives.

Tease photo

A billboard to honor founder of Ku Klux Klan greeted marchers at Selma "Bloody Sunday" event

Those who marched across the Edmund Pettus Bridge to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of "Bloody Sunday" were greeted with a billboard to honor the founder of the Ku Klux Klan, Nathan Bedford Forrest.

Construction Development in Boston is booming and Massport plans on diversity playing a central role.

Massport expects full participation in designing, construction, equity, business tenancy as well as jobs with their $700 million construction projects.

Tease photo

Disrespect for nation’s president is un-American

Rudy Giuliani’s criticism of President Barack Obama was so beyond the pale that it failed to provoke thoughtful comment. However, one could perceive in Giuliani’s attitude an impending social danger for the nation.

Tease photo

A silent assault on personal security

While news media have focused attention on the U.S. government surveillance uncovered by Edward Snowden, corporations have attained unprecedented access to personal data in recent years.

More stories