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Melvin B. Miller

Publisher & Editor

617-936-7796

Email: mbm@b-banner.com

A native of Boston, Melvin B. Miller has been actively involved in political and public affairs for more than 40 years. In 1965, he founded the Bay State Banner, a weekly newspaper advocating the interests of Greater Boston’s African American community. Miller has served as the Banner’s publisher and editor since its inception.

Prior to the establishment of the Banner, Miller was an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. In 1973, the State Banking Commissioner appointed him as the Conservator of the Unity Bank and Trust Company, Boston’s first minority bank. Under his stewardship the bank’s operations became profitable for the first time. In 1977, the Mayor of Boston appointed him as one of the three original commissioners of the Boston Water and Sewer Commission. He later became chairman of the commission in 1980, and managed its operating budget of $193.2 million.

Miller was also a founding partner in the law firm of Fitch, Miller and Tourse, a primarily corporate law firm and he engaged in the practice of law there from 1981 until 1991. He was also Vice President and General Counsel of WHDH-TV, Boston’s CBS affiliate from 1982 until 1993.

A long-term trustee of Boston University, Miller became a Trustee Emeritus in 2005. He served in the three-member National Advisory Council to American Companies doing business in South Africa under the Sullivan Principles until the council was disbanded after the fall of apartheid. Miller is also a trustee of the Huntington Theatre Company and a director of OneUnited Bank, the largest African American owned and operated bank in the U.S.

A graduate of Boston Latin School, Harvard University and Columbia Law School, an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred on him by Suffolk University and Emerson College.



Recent Stories

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Equality still a challenge after 40 years of busing

Court-ordered desegregation was implemented in response to the longstanding unequal allocation of resources in Boston’s public schools.

The math is simple: Entitlements decline with the growth of good-paying jobs

Many low-income workers are better off on public benefits that pay for housing, food, and health care than they are working a minimum wage job. A Harvard economist argues that allowing people to continue to collect benefits while employed would help transition workers into financial independence.

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Good news in the battle against poverty

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the birth rate for teens 15-19 years old has dropped from 57 percent in 1991 to 26 percent today. The decline in teen births has saved the government $12 billion in the cost of providing social services.

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Ferguson blacks reap consequences of failure to vote

Blacks make up nearly 70 percent of the population of Ferguson, Mo., yet there’s just one black person on the town’s board of selectmen and just three of the town’s 53 officers are black. Voter turnout among blacks in Ferguson is low, leaving the town’s white minority in control of municipal government.

Broadening children’s perspectives

Conversations about race and ethnicity in America rarely include concern about the status and well-being of Native Americans

Book on Native Americans can give children a broader perspective on Native Americans and the natural world.

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Obama’s tough response is appropriate

Criticism of President Obama’s response to the Islamic State’s murder of James Foley ignores the broader implications of the president’s response.

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Police homicides: A continuing national problem

Police shootings of unarmed black men will continue until blacks amass political power.

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Ferguson, Missouri’s lesson on elections

Being Majority Minority does not beget power - voting does.

Ferguson demonstrates to blacks in Boston and elsewhere that voting is not at all an idle exercise.

Globe articles target vital small business program that benefits Boston’s small businesses

A series of Boston Globe articles targeted The Boston Local Development Corporation, a BRA lending program that shored up local businesses during the Great Recession.

Re-elect Auditor Bump — keep government honest

State Auditor Suzanne Bump has uncovered waste and fraud in government agencies, leading to significant government reforms.



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