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Melvin B. Miller

Publisher & Editor

617-936-7796

A native of Boston, Melvin B. Miller has been actively involved in political and public affairs for more than 40 years. In 1965, he founded the Bay State Banner, a weekly newspaper advocating the interests of Greater Boston’s African American community. Miller has served as the Banner’s publisher and editor since its inception.

Prior to the establishment of the Banner, Miller was an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. In 1973, the State Banking Commissioner appointed him as the Conservator of the Unity Bank and Trust Company, Boston’s first minority bank. Under his stewardship the bank’s operations became profitable for the first time. In 1977, the Mayor of Boston appointed him as one of the three original commissioners of the Boston Water and Sewer Commission. He later became chairman of the commission in 1980, and managed its operating budget of $193.2 million.

Miller was also a founding partner in the law firm of Fitch, Miller and Tourse, a primarily corporate law firm and he engaged in the practice of law there from 1981 until 1991. He was also Vice President and General Counsel of WHDH-TV, Boston’s CBS affiliate from 1982 until 1993.

A long-term trustee of Boston University, Miller became a Trustee Emeritus in 2005. He served in the three-member National Advisory Council to American Companies doing business in South Africa under the Sullivan Principles until the council was disbanded after the fall of apartheid. Miller is also a trustee of the Huntington Theatre Company and a director of OneUnited Bank, the largest African American owned and operated bank in the U.S.

A graduate of Boston Latin School, Harvard University and Columbia Law School, an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred on him by Suffolk University and Emerson College.



Recent Stories

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The moral imperative of the Christmas season

It is easy for all but the devout to forget the message of Christmas. According to St. Luke (2:14) the heavenly host appeared to announce the birth of the Christ child and deliver the message that is often repeated at this time of year: “Peace on Earth, good will to men.”

Economic diversity is inevitable in Roxbury

It was just a matter of time before astute realtors would discover the beauty and convenient location of Roxbury. It is inevitable for Roxbury to become the home of economically as well as racially diverse residents. Those opposed to the change can protest, but they will be unable to prevent a natural process from occurring.

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Facilitating consumer fraud

Trump administration working to undo consumer protections

Working-class Americans should be concerned that Trump and his cronies are unwilling to support an organization to protect consumers against being cheated in financial transactions.

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America is accustomed to war

After 16 years, U.S. still waging war in Afghanistan

Is America at war?

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Harmful blowback from white supremacy

The time for whites to fantasize about the white supremacy is long gone, and no effort will be able to resurrect it. The more significant issue is the common interests beyond race that affect everyone’s economic status. The privileged who deny everyone affordable health care and a livable minimum wage, among other interests, insist that out of white solidarity, white American citizens should support policies that are detrimental even to their own interests.

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Strategic voting builds power

If there is to be political cohesion among African Americans in the future, the establishment of standards of commitment to the community must be established. The alternative is everybody just going it alone.

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No compromise on freedom

Gen. John Kelly’s remarks on Civil War distort history

Gen. John Kelly has to understand that there can be no compromise on the fundamental issue of freedom.

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A losing strategy

America has waged a war on drugs since 1970 that has cost almost $1 trillion. The cost for law enforcement in 2015 was $36 billion. Another estimated $40 billion is spent each year for incarcerating persons convicted of drug related crimes. Together that totals $76 billion, not including the social cost of imprisoning a family’s bread winner.

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It’s time to forge political unity

The goal now for blacks must be to go to the polls on Tuesday, Nov. 7, and establish such a strong black vote that future politicians will be more reluctant to disrespect the interests of the community. Then win or lose in this election, the people will have begun to establish a political bloc of considerable value.

Much at stake in council races

It is likely that the four at-large Boston city councilors will all be re-elected. However, there is greater status for the councilor with the greatest number of votes. African American voters should be certain to vote for Ayanna Pressley. She deserves a strong turnout in order to become an even stronger voice on important issues.

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