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Melvin B. Miller

Publisher & Editor

617-936-7796

A native of Boston, Melvin B. Miller has been actively involved in political and public affairs for more than 40 years. In 1965, he founded the Bay State Banner, a weekly newspaper advocating the interests of Greater Boston’s African American community. Miller has served as the Banner’s publisher and editor since its inception.

Prior to the establishment of the Banner, Miller was an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. In 1973, the State Banking Commissioner appointed him as the Conservator of the Unity Bank and Trust Company, Boston’s first minority bank. Under his stewardship the bank’s operations became profitable for the first time. In 1977, the Mayor of Boston appointed him as one of the three original commissioners of the Boston Water and Sewer Commission. He later became chairman of the commission in 1980, and managed its operating budget of $193.2 million.

Miller was also a founding partner in the law firm of Fitch, Miller and Tourse, a primarily corporate law firm and he engaged in the practice of law there from 1981 until 1991. He was also Vice President and General Counsel of WHDH-TV, Boston’s CBS affiliate from 1982 until 1993.

A long-term trustee of Boston University, Miller became a Trustee Emeritus in 2005. He served in the three-member National Advisory Council to American Companies doing business in South Africa under the Sullivan Principles until the council was disbanded after the fall of apartheid. Miller is also a trustee of the Huntington Theatre Company and a director of OneUnited Bank, the largest African American owned and operated bank in the U.S.

A graduate of Boston Latin School, Harvard University and Columbia Law School, an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred on him by Suffolk University and Emerson College.



Recent Stories

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A strategic blunder for "Black Lives Matter" demonstrators

In a strategic error, “Black Lives Matter” demonstrators forced Sanders from the stage when delivering a speech in his campaign for President.

Vote Tuesday, September 8

The Boston 2015 preliminary balloting will be held September 8. The only contested races for district City Council seats that will appear on the ballot Sept. 8 will be in Dorchester’s District 4 and Roxbury’s District 7. Regardless of the anticipated outcome, it is important to vote. Be somebody and be counted.

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Consistent voter turnout is key to building real political power

Although their numbers are in decline, Republicans have executed a strategy to maintain political power by dominating state politics, occupying the governorship in 31 states and controlling 28 legislatures. African American voters have gone to the polls in high numbers during presidential races, but have failed to do so in local elections, ceding political ground to Republicans.

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Holding police to a higher standard

Insulting, hostile and violent police supported by oppressive criminal justice systems have had a devastating impact on urban black communities. It is no wonder that the slogan “Black Lives Matter” has gained such acceptance and support.

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Conservative ideology strangles Social Security

Conservative opposition to government intervention in capital markets has hamstrung Social Security, barring the program from investing in U.S. or foreign corporations and limiting its capacity to earn interest.

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Too much collateral damage in war on drugs

Despite the substantial expenditure of funds, it is estimated that no more than 10 percent of the illicit drug traffic is interdicted. There is an ongoing debate, about whether we have lost the war on drugs.

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Racial conflict obscures common concern over wealth

The Confederate flag was removed in Columbia on July 10, 2015. At that time the wealth and income disparity in America was as great as during the Great Depression of the 1930s and, with their greater population, the number of white Americans living in poverty was almost twice the number of blacks. Let the fall of the flag mark the date when Americans of limited income began to work together for the general good.

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Trouncing Trump

The riposte to Donald Trump’s remarks by the Hispanics was so effective, African Americans should now look beyond the tired strategies for protest that were developed in the civil rights era.

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The Charleston massacre: A symbolic act of racial hatred

It was no accident, according to Sanders, that Roof drove 120 miles to launch his attack on June 17, exactly 193 years later to the day that Denmark Vesey’s revolt was crushed. Before he pulled the trigger, Roof is reported to have said, “You rape our women and you’re taking over our country and you have to go.” Roof left one person alive to tell the story. The intention was to strike terror in the hearts of African Americans.

Meaning of Texas’ Juneteenth lost in Boston

Juneteenth was originally a celebration for Texans. Efforts to extend it beyond the Lone Star State create a historical conundrum. The date that should be celebrated for the legal abolition of slavery in America is Dec. 6, 1865, for the ratification of the 13th Amendment.

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