Melvin B. Miller

Publisher & Editor


A native of Boston, Melvin B. Miller has been actively involved in political and public affairs for more than 40 years. In 1965, he founded the Bay State Banner, a weekly newspaper advocating the interests of Greater Boston’s African American community. Miller has served as the Banner’s publisher and editor since its inception.

Prior to the establishment of the Banner, Miller was an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. In 1973, the State Banking Commissioner appointed him as the Conservator of the Unity Bank and Trust Company, Boston’s first minority bank. Under his stewardship the bank’s operations became profitable for the first time. In 1977, the Mayor of Boston appointed him as one of the three original commissioners of the Boston Water and Sewer Commission. He later became chairman of the commission in 1980, and managed its operating budget of $193.2 million.

Miller was also a founding partner in the law firm of Fitch, Miller and Tourse, a primarily corporate law firm and he engaged in the practice of law there from 1981 until 1991. He was also Vice President and General Counsel of WHDH-TV, Boston’s CBS affiliate from 1982 until 1993.

A long-term trustee of Boston University, Miller became a Trustee Emeritus in 2005. He served in the three-member National Advisory Council to American Companies doing business in South Africa under the Sullivan Principles until the council was disbanded after the fall of apartheid. Miller is also a trustee of the Huntington Theatre Company and a director of OneUnited Bank, the largest African American owned and operated bank in the U.S.

A graduate of Boston Latin School, Harvard University and Columbia Law School, an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred on him by Suffolk University and Emerson College.

Recent Stories

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Boston-area blacks have a history of enterprise and ingenuity

Slavery, segregation and blatant racial discrimination have not succeeded in destroying the ingenuity and creativity of African Americans. Indeed, today’s more supportive circumstances should open the door to greater entrepreneurial opportunities for those who are skilled and determined.

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Developing a plan to build wealth

The quest for racial equality in America now confronts the most demanding obstacle — equitable economic attainment. That does not mean that African Americans and Latinos must suddenly become wealthy. The objective is that their income and wealth statistics become comparable to the data of other racial groups. The Banner’s recent financial literacy conference, “Money Talk,” held at Roxbury Community College provided advice and information on how to build black wealth.

Trump proposes plunder

Under Trump, America would become a rogue nation that plunders the natural resources of weaker countries. Trump supports theft on a grand scale. Is that how Trump plans to “Make America Great Again”?

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The real problem at BLS: Too few black applicants

Black leaders ought to focus on the more serious problem at Latin School — the lack of preparation to enable blacks to pass the test to be admitted.

ICIC promotes inclusion without inclusivity

Media outreach for Inclusivity event missing "minority" voice

According to their website they want to host a "national conversation about what it will take to create inclusive incubators and accelerators! This event will convene incubator and accelerator leaders, economic development professionals, city officials, and other stakeholders interested in inclusive innovation to identify strategies to break down barriers for women and minority entrepreneurs." But the newspaper of record for this community - not included.

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An American tradition of predation

Banks were once considered to be the safest place to secure one’s funds. A major purpose of banks has always been to serve as the safest depository, but now that assurance has been breached. The Wells Fargo Bank has fired 5,300 employees for failing to enroll depositors in additional accounts and then charging them a reported $1.5 million or more in fees. The issue now confronting the country is whether criminal indictments are to be filed against the bank executives who benefitted from bonuses earned from the fraud but were not directly involved in the scam.

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Vote ‘yes’ for better educational opportunities

Continued excuses for failure in the academic outcomes from public schools are unacceptable. Charter schools indicate that educational success is possible. It is too soon to shut down the innovation by voting “no” on Question 2. Vote “yes,” for the children’s sake.

A race-baiting strategy

Trump is masterful at playing the race card. The skill requires that his comments or deeds be defensible as innocent of racism. For him to be branded an outright bigot would not help his worldly image. But Trump is certainly aware that about half of his supporters have negative attitudes towards blacks. Several polls have established this fact. With his former assumption of the leadership of the “birther” movement to challenge Barack Obama’s constitutional legitimacy to be president, Trump demonstrated a willingness to be the regent of the racists.

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Hillary – the clear choice for Sanders supporters

Avid supporters of Bernie Sanders who do not vote for Hillary Clinton will have failed to understand Sanders’ political revolution. The objective is to gain support for issues that enhance the economic status of the average citizen. The charisma of the resident of the White House is helpful but is essentially irrelevant. Strategically, the Sanders revolution can maintain its power only with its solid vote for the presidential candidate who is most likely to be sympathetic to its goals. That candidate is Hillary Clinton.

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Applying a double standard to patriotism

Some critics of Colin Kaepernick condemn his protest as seditious, but how could that be when Donald Trump, the Republican candidate for U.S. president, has made public comments during the campaign that are at the very least subversive. Criticism of Trump has been relatively mild when compared with the outcry against Kaepernick who did no more than kneel during the national anthem, in constitutionally protected protest.

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