Karen Miller

Health Editor

617-261-4600 Extension: 7800

Karen E. Miller, Dr.P.H, is Health Editor of the Banner and editor of “Be Healthy,” the quarterly health magazine. Dr. Miller has an eclectic background in the health care industry including direct patient care, higher education, management and consulting. She served as the director of clinical training in rehabilitation medicine at Columbia University’s Harlem Hospital Center. She was an assistant professor at New York University and Texas Women’s University, where she taught courses in functional anatomy, orthopedics, neurology and community health. At New York’s Department of Social Services, she was a consultant for the state’s Medicaid program on issues pertaining to quality of care.

At Tenneco, a large oil and gas company in Houston, Dr. Miller developed and ran a managed care program, which involved selective contracting with physicians and hospitals for the treatment of catastrophic illnesses. As an independent consultant she has provided services to small businesses, insurance companies and physician groups. Dr. Miller is a graduate of Boston University and Columbia University. She earned a master’s degree in public administration from New York University and a doctorate in public health from the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston. Dr. Miller currently serves as a board member of the Massachusetts Association of Mental Health.

Recent Stories

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Yoga: Take a deep breath

Inner peace may improve mental health

Yoga is an ancient discipline that combines meditation with certain positions called asanas. Yoga has been found to improve physical health, and studies now suggest that it can improve mental health as well.

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Exercise for mental health

Good for the body; good for the mind

It is well established that exercise improves health and can lower the risk of several chronic illnesses. Exercise can also prevent or help control depression.

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Anxiety: When worry or panic takes over

More than ‘fight or flight’

Anxiety is the most common type of mental health disorder. It is most often characterized by panic attacks, phobias or generalized anxiety disorder.

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Bipolar disorder

Not the normal ups and downs

People with bipolar disorder have mood swings that shift from depression to mania or hypomania.

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Major depressive disorder

You don’t just ‘snap out of it’

Depression is one of the most harmful mental health disorders.

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Mental Illness

Very common but often goes untreated

Mental illness is one of the most common health disorders. Yet, a large percentage of those afflicted do not get treated.

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Mental health providers

More than just psychiatrists

Although psychiatrists are doctors trained in the diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders, there are several other types of professionals that treat people with mental disorders.

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Stigma of mental health: The sound of silence

An obstacle to seeking care

A high percentage of people with mental health disorders often refrain from seeking care due to the stigma of mental health.

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The facts behind processed meats

What are they, anyway?

Processed meats are red meats and poultry that are preserved by smoking, curing, salting or addition of any chemical preservatives.

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Insurance coverage increases the likelihood of getting preventive services

Screenings can find illnesses earlier when they are easier to treat

Screening tests can often find a disease before symptoms occur. The Affordable Care Act mandates that several screening tests be performed at no cost to the insured individual.

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