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Karen Miller

Health Editor

617-261-4600 Extension: 7800

Karen E. Miller, Dr.P.H, is Health Editor of the Banner and editor of “Be Healthy,” the quarterly health magazine. Dr. Miller has an eclectic background in the health care industry including direct patient care, higher education, management and consulting. She served as the director of clinical training in rehabilitation medicine at Columbia University’s Harlem Hospital Center. She was an assistant professor at New York University and Texas Women’s University, where she taught courses in functional anatomy, orthopedics, neurology and community health. At New York’s Department of Social Services, she was a consultant for the state’s Medicaid program on issues pertaining to quality of care.

At Tenneco, a large oil and gas company in Houston, Dr. Miller developed and ran a managed care program, which involved selective contracting with physicians and hospitals for the treatment of catastrophic illnesses. As an independent consultant she has provided services to small businesses, insurance companies and physician groups. Dr. Miller is a graduate of Boston University and Columbia University. She earned a master’s degree in public administration from New York University and a doctorate in public health from the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston. Dr. Miller currently serves as a board member of the Massachusetts Association of Mental Health.



Recent Stories

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Is your child at risk for type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is no longer an illness for adults only. Fuelled by the surge in obesity in this country, type 2 diabetes is on the rise in adolescents and pre-teens.

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Are you at risk for type 2 diabetes?

Almost 26 million people in this country have type 2 diabetes, but 7 million do not know it. Determine your risk for diabetes and get tested if you have several risk factors for the disease.

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Regular screening can help prevent colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is the second deadliest cancer. It is also largely preventable by regular screenings.

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How to spot “hidden” sugars

Sugar is the body’s source of energy. You can’t live without it, but the type and amount of sugar you consume is key to good health.

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Make half your plate fruits and veggies

Consumption of a variety of fruits and veggies is key to good health

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Changes in vision due to glaucoma

It’s like looking through a tunnel

Glaucoma first affects peripheral, or side vision, but will progress if left untreated.

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Glaucoma can strike at any age

Glaucoma often runs in families and, although it is more common in older people, it can strike at any age.

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January is Glaucoma Awareness Month

Comprehensive eye exams are key to controlling glaucoma

People who have 20/20 vision can still have glaucoma

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January is National Cervical Health Awareness Month

Cervical cancer is now largely preventable

Because of Pap smears and vaccines for HPV, the incidence and death rates of cervical cancer have plummeted.

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The hidden salt: Americans eat twice the recommended daily allowance

Sodium, more commonly known as salt, can make some foods taste so much better, but it doesn’t do much for one’s health. Excess salt, especially when paired with reduced amounts of potassium, can increase the risk of high blood pressure. This can start a chain reaction with unfortunate results.



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