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Karen Miller

Health Editor

617-261-4600 Extension: 7800

Karen E. Miller, Dr.P.H, is Health Editor of the Banner and editor of “Be Healthy,” the quarterly health magazine. Dr. Miller has an eclectic background in the health care industry including direct patient care, higher education, management and consulting. She served as the director of clinical training in rehabilitation medicine at Columbia University’s Harlem Hospital Center. She was an assistant professor at New York University and Texas Women’s University, where she taught courses in functional anatomy, orthopedics, neurology and community health. At New York’s Department of Social Services, she was a consultant for the state’s Medicaid program on issues pertaining to quality of care.

At Tenneco, a large oil and gas company in Houston, Dr. Miller developed and ran a managed care program, which involved selective contracting with physicians and hospitals for the treatment of catastrophic illnesses. As an independent consultant she has provided services to small businesses, insurance companies and physician groups. Dr. Miller is a graduate of Boston University and Columbia University. She earned a master’s degree in public administration from New York University and a doctorate in public health from the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston. Dr. Miller currently serves as a board member of the Massachusetts Association of Mental Health.



Recent Stories

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Flu season is here

Fall brings the foliage … and the flu

The 2016-2017 flu season is upon us. There’s no escaping that pesky virus. Like clockwork, it makes its appearance every fall. Generally, flu season starts in October and peaks between December and March, but can last as long as May, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Avocados: Not just guacamole

Now considered a power food

Avocados are considered a power food because of its high nutritional value. Each contains nearly 20 minerals and vitamins that the body needs to perform sufficiently.

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Blacks closing the gap in life expectancy

Living longer and healthier

Life expectancy in blacks has increased over the years largely due to lower death rates in cancer, heart disease and HIV. In addition, access to medical care has improved with the advent and expansion of Medicaid.

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Exercise and high cholesterol

The first line of attack

Regular exercise can not only prevent high cholesterol, it can often lower it. Thirty minutes of moderate-intensity exercise a day for five days a week is recommended.

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South of the border beans and rice

A healthy vegetarian entree

This recipe from the American Institute for Cancer Research is a good source of fiber, protein and potassium. It contains no saturated fat and is low in sodium.

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Buttons and bows pasta

This recipe from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute provides healthy nutrients but is low in fats, cholesterol and sodium. Each serving contains only 329 calories.

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Prevention of high cholesterol

It’s possible to eat your way to good health

Many cases of high cholesterol can be prevented just by following a healthy lifestyle. If the cholesterol is too high or it does not respond to healthy lifestyle alone, medication — in conjunction with behavioral changes — is warranted. Key words: high cholesterol, smoking, obesity healthy eating, exercise, DASH eating plan, Mediterranean diet

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Metabolic syndrome

A combination of disorders

Metabolic syndrome occurs if three or more medical conditions coexist at the same time. The conditions are high blood pressure, high triglycerides, elevated blood sugar, low HDL and large waist.

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Peripheral arterial disease

Common, but often undetected

Peripheral arterial disease, or PAD, is a common, but often undetected, condition that can result from excessive buildup of plaque in the arteries, particularly in the legs.

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Heart attack and stroke

Major complications from cholesterol

Heart attack and stroke are two of the most common complications from high cholesterol. In both conditions, cholesterol in the arteries blocks energy and nutrients to the organs.

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