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Karen Miller

Health Editor

617-261-4600 Extension: 7800

Karen E. Miller, Dr.P.H, is Health Editor of the Banner and editor of “Be Healthy,” the quarterly health magazine. Dr. Miller has an eclectic background in the health care industry including direct patient care, higher education, management and consulting. She served as the director of clinical training in rehabilitation medicine at Columbia University’s Harlem Hospital Center. She was an assistant professor at New York University and Texas Women’s University, where she taught courses in functional anatomy, orthopedics, neurology and community health. At New York’s Department of Social Services, she was a consultant for the state’s Medicaid program on issues pertaining to quality of care.

At Tenneco, a large oil and gas company in Houston, Dr. Miller developed and ran a managed care program, which involved selective contracting with physicians and hospitals for the treatment of catastrophic illnesses. As an independent consultant she has provided services to small businesses, insurance companies and physician groups. Dr. Miller is a graduate of Boston University and Columbia University. She earned a master’s degree in public administration from New York University and a doctorate in public health from the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston. Dr. Miller currently serves as a board member of the Massachusetts Association of Mental Health.



Recent Stories

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Family caregivers

They give assistance and they need assistance

Alzheimer’s disease has spurred the growth of a large network of informal, or personal, caregivers. Most of these caregivers are unpaid family members and friends.

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The long goodbye

One family recalls its struggle with AD

Alzheimer’s disease is not a solitary affliction. Family members often assume the unpaid role of caretakers.

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Autumn Salad

What’s good for the heart is good for the brain

This recipe – Autumn Salad – contains walnuts and leafy greens that may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Exercise can help ease some Alzheimer’s symptoms

It's never too late to start

Regular physical activity is recommended for all adults regardless of age. Exercise can often ease some of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Salmon Kebabs with Creamy Tzatziki Sauce

This is a tasty recipe for salmon kebabs. Some research indicates that foods high in omega-3 fatty acids, like those found in fatty fish like salmon, can help ward off dementia.

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Clinical Trials

All groups should reap the benefits

Clinical trials are research studies to determine how well a new treatment or procedure works in people.

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Harvard Aging Brain Study

A test of memory

Studies are ongoing to detect the first symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. Memory tests and brain scans are used to detect the earliest changes in memory and the brain that may signal the onset of dementia.

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The A4 study – Alzheimer’s prevention

The purpose of the Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer’s study, or A4 study, is to prevent memory loss due to Alzheimer’s disease. People between the ages of 65 and 85 are eligible to apply for the study.

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Do you forget to remember?

Memories are formed through a three-step process

Memory is a three-step process that includes encoding, or processing the thought, short-term to long-term memory and retrieval. Failure to encode a memory prevents retrieval of the memory at a later time.

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Alzheimer’s Disease

When they no longer know your name

Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, is a progressive, degenerative disease that robs victims of memory, reasoning, thinking and communication and eventually their life.

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