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Karen Miller

Health Editor

617-261-4600 Extension: 7800

Karen E. Miller, Dr.P.H, is Health Editor of the Banner and editor of “Be Healthy,” the quarterly health magazine. Dr. Miller has an eclectic background in the health care industry including direct patient care, higher education, management and consulting. She served as the director of clinical training in rehabilitation medicine at Columbia University’s Harlem Hospital Center. She was an assistant professor at New York University and Texas Women’s University, where she taught courses in functional anatomy, orthopedics, neurology and community health. At New York’s Department of Social Services, she was a consultant for the state’s Medicaid program on issues pertaining to quality of care.

At Tenneco, a large oil and gas company in Houston, Dr. Miller developed and ran a managed care program, which involved selective contracting with physicians and hospitals for the treatment of catastrophic illnesses. As an independent consultant she has provided services to small businesses, insurance companies and physician groups. Dr. Miller is a graduate of Boston University and Columbia University. She earned a master’s degree in public administration from New York University and a doctorate in public health from the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston. Dr. Miller currently serves as a board member of the Massachusetts Association of Mental Health.



Recent Stories

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Glaucoma: The silent thief of sight

Many people lack awareness

Glaucoma is one of the most common causes of blindness in this country. There is no cure for glaucoma, but it can be treated with medicine and surgery.

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The flu: Will antibiotics work?

The difference between bacteria and viruses

Antibiotics are often prescribed for people suffering from the flu. However, antibiotics are designed to treat infections from bacteria. The flu, on the other hand, is a virus and does not respond to antibiotics.

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January is National Cervical Health Awareness Month

Cervical cancer largely preventable

With the advent of Pap smears and immunization against certain types of HPV, the incidence of cervical cancer in this country has plummeted in the past 50 years.

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Diabetes and Cancer

An unexpected link

Current data indicate that the incidence of diabetes may be on the decline. Since research suggests that there is a link between type 2 diabetes and several types of cancer, a drop in diabetes rates may result in lower cancer rates.

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The Food and Drug Administration: Attack on added sugars

Limit to 12½ teaspoons a day

The Food and Drug Administration is at it again. Now the target is sugar, but it’s not just any sugar. It’s the added sugar the administration is going after.

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Exercise and high blood pressure

An alternative method to keep your pressure low

Regular exercise can increase the efficiency of the heart, which can help prevent or control high blood pressure.

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Edamame stew

This recipe is high in potassium and fiber and low in unhealthy fats and sodium. This combination will help lower blood pressure and decrease its risk.

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Quinoa-stuffed tomatoes

This side dish pairs quinoa, a whole grain, with vegetables for a healthy recipe that is low in unhealthy fats, sodium and calories and high in fiber, protein and potassium

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Kidney failure: A silent complication

Dialysis and transplant the only treatments

Uncontrolled high blood pressure is one of the leading causes of kidney failure. Once diagnosed, the only treatments available are dialysis and kidney transplant.

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Heart failure: A weakened and enlarged heart

An inefficient pump

Heart failure, one of the leading causes of death, is often caused by uncontrolled high blood pressure. Because of increased resistance, the heart has to pump harder in order to supply blood to the body.

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