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A legacy of terror

The Equal Justice Initiative has recently issued an academically rigorous report on the historical and sociological implications of the odious practice of terror lynching that sustained the national policy of white supremacy.

The consequences of prolonged neglect of MBTA

When things go wrong, the immediate reaction is to blame someone for the problem. Finding the culprit seems to be more important than curing the crisis. With the collapse of Boston’s public transit system because of the mounting snowfall, the ...

Delayed diversity in the NHL

The New England Patriots’ Super Bowl victory provides an indication of the value of racial diversity. Without consideration of race, the team management selects players on the basis of talent and availability. Then through practice and team discipline, the players ...

A new challenge to fair housing

It would be truly oppressive for the Supreme Court to rule that the government cannot establish incentives to achieve the goal of racial integration in housing. The nation recognized in 1968 that segregated housing is contrary to the principal of ...

The affluent have always had a disproportionate impact on politics

The top 1 percent may control the money, but each citizen has only one vote. The 99 percent still outnumber them.

Preserving black artists in Roxbury

For many years Boston has enjoyed a flourishing community of African American artists. However, the recent death of John Wilson, there is a realization that we are losing too many of the prominent elders of the art world.

The perennial practice of police abuse

The Magna Carta, executed at Runnymede, England in 1215, was the precedent for the Bill of Rights and the right of judicial review that are so critical to Anglo-American jurisprudence. Yet protests against police violence in America continue 800 years ...

Police violence is about more than broken windows

Americans must be willing to adopt imaginative programs to end the police victimization of black men.

An attack on black progress

Gov. Charlie Baker has selected Ronald L. Walker II to join his administration as secretary of Labor and Workforce Development. An objective review of Ron Walker’s resume would determine that he is uniquely qualified for that post. As co-founder and ...

More than ever, education is the key to success

Academic achievement was always respected by African Americans. Even in the days of slavery, education was desired, although it was often unattainable. Black commitment to the importance of educational achievement should now be stronger than ever.

New York police defiantly turn away from civility

New York police officers violated basic laws of civility when they protested during New York Mayor Bill de Blasio’s formal condolences to the family at the funeral of their fellow officer, Rafael Ramos, who was murdered by a deranged killer.

Rage: the product of a violent culture

As the assassination of the New York police officers indicates, non-violence is not an infallible effort.

The death of courtesy

At the end of December it’s time to develop New Year’s resolutions to correct the foibles of the prior year. In order to do this, there has to be an objective assessment of one’s flaws. However, the capacity to perceive ...

Building wealth, even in the season of giving

At a time when many are focused on spending, it’s more important than ever to focus on building wealth.

Rush to condemn Cosby premature

The uncorroborated complaints of sexual impropriety by Bill Cosby arouse the distressing memory among elders of similar past claims against black men.