Too outstanding to be marginalized

People of low social status in the United States and elsewhere have historically been limited to unskilled jobs. Back in 1940 the black population of Boston was only 3 percent of the total. It was then impossible to develop the ...

Roxbury man makes history

Clifton R. Wharton Jr. probably will not be celebrated as an ethnic hero during Black History Month, but his achievements deserve such accolades despite the fact that he is not so well-known. According to a journalist writing in The New ...

Changing of the guard

During his 32 years as a Boston City Councilor, Charles Yancey sought numerous improvements in the community. With a bachelor’s degree from Tufts University and a master’s degree from Harvard University, Yancey well understood the importance of higher education. He ...

Hold the police accountable

Any police officers who are reluctant to perform their duties because of fear of criticism should find another kind of work. At the salary levels now available to the police, citizens can no doubt recruit and train a competent police ...

A compelling case for an intact family unit

Many black children begin life with a great disadvantage. About 72 percent are born to unwed mothers. As a result, about 91 percent of them will live in woman-headed households. There is a high incidence of poverty in that kind ...

A moral divide

Charles Street AME Church is unable or unwilling to repay its loan from OneUnited Bank, and one of Boston’s major law firms has provided pro bono legal services to facilitate a major default on one of the nation’s leading black-owned ...

The 99 percent movement lives

Four years after the Occupy Wall Street movement, 99 percenters are backing presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, who is advancing a vision of shared prosperity in the U.S.

The way to get ahead

Costas Cavounidis and Kevin Lang of Boston University have produced a paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research that demonstrates the impact of bias on unemployed blacks.

Vote Tito Jackson for District 7

The re-election of Tito Jackson is critical for the economic progress of greater Roxbury at a crucial time.

A free market held hostage

Conservatives opposed Obamacare that provides health insurance for the indigent on the basis of preserving economic “free market” theories. Now they are no longer interested in opposing monopolistic pricing that flouts those principles. One has to conclude that the conservatives ...

Distorting history in Texas

A McGraw-Hill textbook in public schools stated that Africans were brought to Texas from the 1500s through the 1800s as workers on large plantations. There was no mention that the blacks were enslaved although the book mentioned that many Europeans ...

Commentary: Roxbury residents were right to reject shelter

The condemnation of the bridge to Long Island was disastrous for the people who relied on the refuge for the homeless there. Long Island was an opportune site because there were no abutters who had to endure the disturbance of ...

The fall of a divisive symbol

For generations, South Carolina has been at the forefront of America’s racial conflict. Now Gov. Nikki Haley has mitigated that role by removing the Confederate battle flag from a place of honor at the state capitol.

Vote on the candidate’s merits

African Americans have developed a wonderfully democratic attitude over the years. A candidate for public office will not benefit substantially from the achievements of his or her family. Similarly the alleged misconduct of family members will not be an impediment. ...

A formidable challenge

Once they are elected, city councilors representing Boston’s districts tend to hold their seats until they voluntarily give them up. But Charles Yancey, who has been elected to 16 two-year terms, might be facing his political demise on Nov. 3.