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Leave the lettuce

Ari LeVaux, More Content Now | 1/26/2018, 6 a.m.
“Locavore” was anointed 2007’s word of the year by the Oxford American English Dictionary. Since then the idea of wanting ...
ONION DRESSING/SALAD Ari Levaux

One option is to add a few tablespoons of toasted sesame oil and a teaspoon of soy sauce to dress up these shreds. Toasted sesame seeds go well here, too, as a replacement for sesame oil. Then mix with the onions. Alternatively, skip the soy and sesame, and just mix the shreds with onion dressing.

And if cabbage is what you’re grating, a dressing of garlic, lime, mayo, shredded Parmesan and a shot of Worcestershire sauce will give it a creamy, vaguely Caesarian flair.

These brussels sprouts will make you wonder just what your parents were serving you when you were young.

These brussels sprouts will make you wonder just what your parents were serving you when you were young.

Fresh Brussels Sprouts Salad

The consummate gastronome Allen Broach of Greensboro, South Carolina, happens, as we speak, to be on a binge of brussels sprout salads, one of which he sent along from the trenches:

1 pound brussels sprouts leaves torn form the sprouts

½ cup toasted walnuts


3 tablespoons finely grated pecorino Romano cheese


3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil or to taste

½ T kosher salt


1 T freshly ground black pepper or to taste


Balsamic reduction to sprinkle over the salad just before serving

Pulling apart the brussels sprout leaves can be laborious but results in a charming salad of green scallop shells. The inner core of the sprouts, which haven’t yet differentiated into leaves, can be thin-sliced. I swapped pecans for the walnuts, and they were great.

For the reduction, heat a half-cup of balsamic vinegar on low, allowing it to slowly thicken to about half the volume. I dressed mine up with pomegranate arils, and the onion dressing, of course. It was special. And local. Enough.