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Lovie Elam: Long-time Democratic delegate

Melvin B. Miller | 7/1/2013, 2:45 p.m.

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Lovie Regina Elam

On June 7, 2013 Lovie Regina Elam of Milton passed away from a sudden heart attack. She was 54. Her family was one of the first black families to move into Milton.

As a young girl, Lovie Elam was well traveled and even won a blue ribbon at a horse show. From first grade to 12th grade, she attended and graduated from Milton Academy (Class of 1976) with her younger, surviving siblings, C. Richard Elam, Esq., of Holland and Brenda L. Elam of Milton.

At her funeral, Governor Deval Patrick recalled their days together at Milton Academy and his lifelong friendship with her. He had written about being part of the Elam household in his autobiography, “A Reason to Believe.”

Lovie Elam graduated from Yale University with a B.A. in the classics, and received her Masters in Education from UMass Boston. She taught for most of her career. At the time of her death, she had almost attained her Ph.D. in education from UMass Boston.

Her mother, June Elam-Mooers of Milton who survives her, said, “She loved the Bible, she loved politics, and she had a passion for teaching those who didn’t have the kind of childhood she had.”

In recent years Lovie Elam taught a rigorous curriculum to urban young adult students, ages 18-24, through the Year Up program, a college and career readiness program.

She was a long-time delegate at every Democratic Convention. Her father, the late Clarence R. Elam, was chairman of the City of Boston Licensing Board. Her uncle Harry J. Elam was the first black judge appointed to the Boston Municipal Court. Her aunt Harriet Elam was appointed by President Bill Clinton to be the Ambassador to Senegal.

Beloved niece Kaleeya A. Elam-Smith of Milton, several aunts, uncles and cousins also survive Lovie Elam.

Graveside services were held at the Blue Hill Cemetery in Braintree on June 11, 2013 under the direction of the Cartwright Funeral Home in Braintree.