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Marlon Wayans is on the comedy circuit here in Boston as he prepares for his upcoming role as one of America’s funniest comedians.

Bridgit Brown | 8/17/2010, 10:57 a.m.
(Photo courtesy of the Willbur Theatre) Marlon Wayans is on the comedy circuit here in Boston as he...

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Marlon Wayans is on the comedy circuit here in Boston as he prepares for his upcoming role as one of America’s funniest comedians.

Who can play Richard Pryor? People say that only Eddie Murphy can mimic the late comedian. Others have pointed a finger at Mike Epps. But don’t sleep on Marlon Wayans, the youngest of the Wayans family clan. He certainly has the potential and the self-determination. With the film “Richard Pryor: Is It Something I Said?” expected to go into production in late 2011, Marlon will play the lead and is already on the road, doing the work before the work begins, so to speak.

His visit to Boston this week for two live stand-up performances at the Wilbur Theatre is part of his quest to create a meaningful role as one of his major life influences. While Shawn — his older brother by just a little over a year — will be performing standup at the Wilbur too, this tour is research for the multi-talented Marlon.

How do you define yourself?  Is there one single definition?

I’m an artist. I can do drama. I can do comedy. I can do physical. I can do verbal. I can write. I can produce, I can direct, I can play piano — taught myself. I’m trying to learn guitar. I love to do, I love to work, I love to know. I take pictures, trying to learn some photography. To me it’s just expression. I love to express. I want them to open up my head when I die and see a burnt up little nugget there.

What are your parents like? Is there like a family credo — that everybody must help each other out?

Kind of. My mother used to make the older brother carry the younger brother around, no matter what. Always. And she just taught us, “each one, teach one.” My mom also used to tell my brother that “I made him for you … but this is your responsibility.”

Really?

Yes. Not only did she create that whole system, but it was kind of good for her because she had a whole bunch of babysitters. When I came along, I was self-sufficient! I was cooking at six-years-old! My brothers would come home from college and I would cook breakfast. And we were doing laundry.  It was like we were our own little dry cleaners. I had to wash my father’s stinky drawers. I had to wash my sister’s old nasty panties, my brothers’ old nasty drawers, my mama’s socks, my father’s socks, and those were hell! But we learned to be self-sufficient before we got out of that house.

That’s some serious child-rearing.

My mom was like “I don’t want you to have to need no woman! They should be lucky to have you, son. My baby’s gonna take care of that gal, you hear? So you put on some lotion. Women don’t like no ashy man. And wash your behind after you go to the bathroom. They don’t like no stink man, either. Don’t be like your father; don’t smell like green onions.”